The Toxic Avenger will avenge once again in new reboot

Those who grew up in the ’80s, and even the ’90s, no doubt remember Troma’s disgusting anti-hero The Toxic Avenger. Michael Herz and Lloyd Kaufman’s 1984 splatter superhero film spawned three sequels, a musical, a video game, and, yes, even a children’s cartoon. Well, Toxie is back, as Variety reports that actor, screenwriter, and director Macon Blair has grabbed hold of the slimy toxic drum and will write and direct a new reboot for Legendary. Even better, Kaufman and Herz will serve as producers to make sure it’s as grimy and despicable as ever. Blair, who starred in Jeremy Saulnier’s indie thrillers Blue Ruin and Green Room, has recently made some waves as a screenwriter and filmmaker. In 2017, he won Sundance’s Grand Jury Prize I Don’t Feel At Home in This World Anymore, and has since penned Netflix’s Hold the Dark and Small Crimes. Rest assured, this will be brutal, and Blair will certainly add another edge to the janitor-turned-toxic crusader. Revisit the original film’s trailer below, in addition to the trailer for his award-winning directorial debut shortly after. [embedded content] [embedded content] Consequence of Sound RSS Feed

Luke Perry Redefined Cool and Slayed My Heart

“I always felt like something of an outsider, but I identified with people on the screen.” –Luke Perry Hearts didn’t just stop at the sight of Luke Perry; they doubled, at least for this writer. As a young and easily confused six-year-old, seeing Dylan McKay show up on the third episode of Fox’s Beverly Hills 90210 was confounding. Here was this loner, this rebel, this real James Dean type, who was a complete juxtaposition from the rest of the hunks — from Jason Priestley’s kindhearted braniac Brandon Walsh to Ian Ziering’s insufferable Steve Sanders. He defined “slacker chic”: he was effeminate, he wore his heart on his sleeve, and he won over the coolest of the West Beverly girls. It was an instant first sell, too. When we first meet Dylan, he’s literally surrounded by bolts of electricity as he slinks out of the shadows of West Beverly’s computer lab. From there, he scares off two jocks, gets Brandon to cut school, cruises around in a vintage Porsche convertible with a copy of Byron, surfs the big waves, breaks the big boards, and orders hamburgers in his millionaire father’s hotel suite with some Beverly babes. Though, as we all learn […]

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles: When the Fab Four Met Ed Sullivan

The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show, Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery “Struck by lightning.” That’s how my father describes the sensation of watching The Beatles’ first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9, 1964. “I had never been so excited by any musical group or performance like that.” It’s a definitive event from his childhood — as it was for millions of other Americans — as monumental as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy or the Apollo 11 Moon landing. The next day at school, it was all he and his classmates (and their teachers) wanted to talk about; in the days that followed, he remembers spinning his copy of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” while he and his sisters pretended to be The Beatles, playing along on broomsticks as if they were guitars. [embedded content] Listening to him talk about his memories of that performance 55 years ago, I realize that it can never happen again. The world’s gotten smaller, but the culture’s gotten larger; TVs have more than three channels, and “rock music” is no longer synonymous with “pop music.” It’s impossible now for any musical act, let alone a rock […]

The Simpsons may be more valuable to Disney off the air

The Simpsons is currently amidst its 30th season. By its end, Matt Groening’s long-running series will have 663 original episodes to its name, which is not just an impressive feat, but a lucrative one. That’s good. The problem is that those dollar signs will soon be reflecting in the eyes of Disney, who will eventually acquire America’s animated family. That’s bad. Well, at least for those who love the new episodes. Here’s why: According to Variety, The Simpsons has been a loss for the Fox Broadcasting Company (FBC), and that loss has only increased over the years, but the network has always recouped the costs through licensing deals and merchandising opportunities. One example is its landmark 2013 deal with FXX, which was valued at roughly $750 million and expires in 2023. That all changes, however, with the impending Disney takeover, which will alter how those licensing deals are orchestrated. What’s more, FBC and 20th Century Fox will no longer share a balance sheet, which means the cost per episode will go solely to FBC. In other words, FBC will be footing the bill for new episodes with no guarantee on recouping those expenses. (Read: The Simpsons’ Top 30 Episodes) To make matters more […]