Nick Cave hints at new Grinderman album from “yet to be completed trilogy”

It’s been a long time since we’ve heard from Grinderman — nine years, to be exact. Now Nick Cave is hinting that a new Grinderman album is on the way, almost a decade since their sophomore album dropped. During a 2011 tour, Cave told an audience that “it’s over” for the band — a statement later clarified by drummer Jim Sclavunos as a “bye-bye” because “who knows what will happen in five or 10 years time.” Well, sure enough, the band got an itch to switch from Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds (which all of the band members are in) to Grinderman. Cave recently took to his blog to confirm Grinderman’s first and second records are “part of a yet to be completed trilogy,” NME notes. The new record would follow up their 2010 release, Grinderman 2. (Read: A Streaming Companion to Nick Cave) Cave brought up Grinderman in response to a simple fan question: “When was the last time you felt a sense of pride (in yourself)?” While responding, Cave detailed his love for prog rock, specifically the complexities of King Crimson, and went on to note that he hopes his music does the same. The Grinderman song “Heathen Child”, which […]

Ranking: Every Lollapalooza Lineup from Worst to Best

Rank and File finds us sorting through an exhaustive, comprehensive body of work or collection of pop-culture artifacts. This time, we celebrate Lollapalooza by determining which installment of the festival was the greatest of them all. The dog days of summer mean that Lollapalooza is just around the corner, and thousands of music fans are about to descend upon Chicago’s Grant Park. It’s hard to believe that, in 1991, Perry Farrell created the festival as a showcase for Jane’s Addiction‘s last hurrah. Of course, many things have changed since its initial heyday in the ’90s. In the US, Lolla has grown and evolved drastically from its touring festival roots, having survived a hibernation from 1997 until 2003, in addition to its canceled 2004 installment. Since then, Lollapalooza has settled down in the Windy City, gradually expanding from two to three to four days. (Though, one could argue the fest’s touring spirit lives on through its international counterparts, which have sprung up in Chile, Brazil, Argentina, Germany, and Sweden.) Throughout its history, some of the most iconic acts in music have performed at the festival, from Paul McCartney to Kanye West to Arcade Fire, in addition to up-and-coming talent that have […]

Sherly Crow duest with Johnny Cash on new version of “Redemption Day”: Stream

Sheryl Crow plans to release what she’s previously called her “final album” later this summer. Though no firm details have been revealed, the record is said to feature a number of collaborations with the likes of Keith Richards, Stevie Nicks, and St. Vincent. Johnny Cash also appears from beyond the grave, dueting on a reworking of Crow’s 1996 track “Redemption Day”. Cash actually first encountered the song in 2003 after being introduced to it by his son-in-law. The Man in Black approached Crow about covering “Redemption Day”, but first drilled her about the depth of meaning. “He asked a lot of questions about different lines and what I meant,” Crow recalled in a press release. “He didn’t want to put his voice to the song without being able to believe it heart and soul.” He ended up recording his own take on the anti-war track, though it wasn’t released until after his death, appearing on 2010’s posthumous American VI: Ain’t No Grave. After playing alongside Cash’s rendition during her 2014 tour, Crow decided to take “Redemption Day” back into the studio to record a new duet version. The update comes to us via a music video directed by Shaun Silva […]

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles: When the Fab Four Met Ed Sullivan

The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show, Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery “Struck by lightning.” That’s how my father describes the sensation of watching The Beatles’ first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9, 1964. “I had never been so excited by any musical group or performance like that.” It’s a definitive event from his childhood — as it was for millions of other Americans — as monumental as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy or the Apollo 11 Moon landing. The next day at school, it was all he and his classmates (and their teachers) wanted to talk about; in the days that followed, he remembers spinning his copy of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” while he and his sisters pretended to be The Beatles, playing along on broomsticks as if they were guitars. [embedded content] Listening to him talk about his memories of that performance 55 years ago, I realize that it can never happen again. The world’s gotten smaller, but the culture’s gotten larger; TVs have more than three channels, and “rock music” is no longer synonymous with “pop music.” It’s impossible now for any musical act, let alone a rock […]